SHA-256 Algorithmus – Verschlüsselung – BitcoinWiki

BitcoinZ: A community gift to the world.

BitcoinZ, a cryptocurrency based on bitcoin + zkSNARKs
[link]

0xBitcoin

The first pure mined ERC20 Token for Ethereum, using the soliditySHA3 hashing algorithm. This is a smart contract which follows the original Satoshi Nakamoto whitepaper to form a fundamentally sound trustless currency. This combines the scarcity and fair distribution model of Bitcoin with the speed and extensibility of the Ethereum network. Thus, it is named 0xBitcoin or 0xBTC where 0x represents the Ethereum Network and ecosystem.
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Devcoin: ethically inspired cryptocurrency

A community based around the Devcoin cryptocurrency, an ethically inspired project created to help fund FOSS developers, artists, musicians, writers and more.
[link]

11-13 12:12 - 'Greif Expressed by Bjarne Stroustrup over the use of ‘C++’ in Bitcoins’ Algorithm : TheCoinRepublic' (i.redd.it) by /u/Tech_Crypto removed from /r/Bitcoin within 1-11min

Greif Expressed by Bjarne Stroustrup over the use of ‘C++’ in Bitcoins’ Algorithm : TheCoinRepublic
Go1dfish undelete link
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Author: Tech_Crypto
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Will quantum computers affect Bitcoin security, or support the ideology?

Google and IBM have built quantum computers. Given the exponential capability of a quantum computer over current computing technology will Bitcoins algorithm be able to manipulated by quantum computers? Does quantum computing have the potential to create centralization of Bitcoin? Or will the existence of quantum computing support the Bitcoin ideology? I'd be interested in your opinions.
submitted by Speedmetal666 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Translation: strength in numbers

I was wondering what the best Sanskrit translation of the English saying "strength in numbers" would be? I tried using https://spokensanskrit.org and naively got something like this:
शक्ति सङ्ख्या अप्यस्ति
zakti saGkhyA apyasti
I'm sure that is wrong and a very poor translation, so would be happy to hear better ways to phrase this.
Additionally, this is one of the more popular mottos for Bitcoin, where it takes on several possible additional meanings, like a pun. Aside from meaning strength/safety in a large crowd, it may also refer to safety with cryptography. Another interpretation alludes to safety with "mathematical rules", referring to the Bitcoin algorithm.
Could you think of the best way to try and capture as much of the nuances as possible in Sanskrit?
submitted by estradata to sanskrit [link] [comments]

05-24 00:54 - 'Topic: [Quantum computing] Reason: [SHA-256 encryption breaking]' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/Xyopsi removed from /r/Bitcoin within 42-52min

'''
After the years of successful advancements of quantum computing, I have been worrying about Bitcoin and it's future. I've done research about quantum computing and it's capabilities and it's not looking too good for our beloved cryptocurrency because it might have a security flaw. With quantum computing the SHA-256 (that secures Bitcoin) algorithm can be broken later in the future with the advancements with quantum computing. I'm not saying it's going to happen tomorrow but there is a chance that cryptography protocols are going to have to change to ensure the integrity of bitcoin and it's future. This is hypothetical though, not to fear monger or troll but this needs to be a discussion on which people can share opinions about this topic and come up solutions to prevent keys to be solved by in which the government or tech companies like Google, Amazon, etc can crack. I feel that this is important to discuss about and I care about the future of bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies and it's contributers and holders.
Sources used: [link]1
[link]2
[link]3
[link]4
[link]5
Edit: Thanks u/jenny82ishere for fact checking me. The SHA-256 algorithm is not encryption.
'''
Topic: [Quantum computing] Reason: [SHA-256 encryption breaking]
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Author: Xyopsi
1: b*oc**hainhub.net/bl**/*lo*/cryptogra*hy-**ockc**in-b*tc**n/ 2: www.sci***edai*y.com/news/*a**er*energy/qu*ntum_co****i*g/ 3: www.*oogle.**m/a*p/s/ww*.science*ews.org/ar**cl*/n**-***nt****om*u*ers-can-*pe*ate**ig**r-temperatures/amp 4: en.m.wik*ped**.or*/wiki/**A-* 5: en.bitco*n**t*wi*i/Wall*t_en*ryp*io*
Unknown links are censored to prevent spreading illicit content.
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Price Prediction 2020

Bitcoin Price Prediction 2020
Bitcoin is a digital and fully decentralized currency. Decentralization of the network is the main goal of the Bitcoin. The fundamental achievement of bitcoin is its genuine peer-to-peer payment system; no person or even institution was “in charge” of bitcoin.
by StealthEX
Three main ideas were embedded in the Bitcoin code:
• Bitcoin should not be regulated by anyone.
• Its emission should not be infinite.
• The cost of a coin depends on its demand.
The maximum number of bitcoins – 21 million, and the possibility of their extraction were laid in the bitcoin algorithm.
Bitcoin “halving” occurred on 11 May 2020. This means that its miners’ remuneration was halved.

Bitcoin statistics

Source: CoinMarketCap, Data was taken on 19 May 2020.
Current Price $9,672.54
ROI since launch 7,048.96%
Market Cap $177,790,148,642
Market Rank #1
Circulating Supply 18,380,918 BTC
Total Supply 18,380,918 BTC

Bitcoin achievements and future plans

Bitcoin in 2019:

Bitcoin Core released:
• Improved Partially Signed Bitcoin Transaction (PSBT) support and added support for output script descriptors. This allowed it to be used with the first released version of the Hardware Wallet Interface (HWI).
• Implemented the new CPFP carve-out mempool policy, added initial support for BIP158-style compact block filters (currently RPC only), improved security by disabling protocols such as BIP37 bloom filters and BIP70 payment requests by default. It also switches GUI users to bech32 addresses by default.
LND released:
• Support for Static Channel Backups (SCBs) that help users recover any funds settled in their LN channels even if they’ve lost their recent channel state.
• Improved autopilot to help users open new channels, plus built-in compatibility with Lightning Loop for moving funds onchain without closing a channel or using a custodian.
• Added support for using a watchtower to guard your channels when you’re offline.
• Added support for a more extensible onion format, improved backup safety, and improved the watchtower support.
Other:
• Its price has more than doubled.
• For the first time in history Bitcoin was assigned a rating of “A”.
• British court recognized Bitcoin as property.
• The second largest in Germany and ninth in Europe, the Stuttgart Stock Exchange launched Bitcoin spot trading.
• In Russia, for the first time, Bitcoin was added to the authorized capital of a company.
• Bitcoin Named the Best Asset of the Decade by Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

Bitcoin in 2020:

• Focus on the Lightning Network. The continuation of work on c-lightning (Blockstream), Eclair (ACINQ), LND (Lightning Labs) and Rust Lightning to develop the protocol.
• Expectation of the SchnorTaproot softfork in 2020 or 2021 that is improvement in fungibility, privacy, scalability and functionality.
Bitcoin “halving” occurred on 11 May 2020.
• Amid the general crisis caused by coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) and the depreciation of money, the Bitcoin value is growing.

Bitcoin Technical Analysis

Source: TradingView, Data was taken on 19 May 2020.

Bitcoin Price Prediction 2020

TradingBeasts BTC price prediction

The Bitcoin price is forecasted to reach $8,681 (-10.25%) by the beginning of June 2020. At the end of 2020 BTC price will be $8,345 (-13.72%).

Wallet investor Bitcoin price prediction

Bitcoin price prediction: maximum price by the end of December 2020 $13,559 (+40.19%), a minimum price $7,886 (-18.47%).

DigitalCoinPrice Bitcoin forecast

There will be a positive trend in the future and the BTC might be good for investing. BTC price will be equal to $22,501 at the end of 2020 (+132.63%).

Crypto-Rating BTC price forecast

Based on historical data Bitcoin price will be at $12,272 (+26.87%) in 1 week and $13,338 (+37.90%) in 1 month. Analysis of the cryptocurrency market shows that Bitcoin price may reach $18,679 (+93.11%) by the 1st of January 2021 driven by the potential interest from large institutional investors and more regulation expected in the field of digital currencies.

Buy Bitcoin at StealthEX

Bitcoin (BTC) is available for exchange on StealthEX with a low fee. Follow these easy steps:
✔ Choose the pair and the amount for your exchange. For example ETH to BTC.
✔ Press the “Start exchange” button.
✔ Provide the recipient address to which the coins will be transferred.
✔ Move your cryptocurrency for the exchange.
✔ Receive your coins.
The views and opinions expressed here are solely those of the author. Every investment and trading move involves risk. You should conduct your own research when making a decision.
Original article was posted on https://stealthex.io/blog/2020/05/19/bitcoin-price-prediction-2020/
submitted by Stealthex_io to u/Stealthex_io [link] [comments]

Change/Revamp Feedback System

Change/Revamp Feedback System
Since this isn't going to be taken into account if I posted this to suggestions, I'll post it here.

Currently, according to LocalBitcoins FAQ's it states:
https://preview.redd.it/7ctm2o2hrze41.png?width=1417&format=png&auto=webp&s=671aed4d0b2195a8be4f378706e980e646ba1a13
The feedback system has been an ongoing issue and is easy to abuse. Users are free to leave feedback on other users despite the fact that they haven't traded with them? This is absurd. LocalBitcoins should completely remove the option to leave feedback to other users if you cancel the trade.
The reasoning is that, leaving feedback to someone you haven't traded with is not an accurate representation of how trusted they are nor how good of a trader they are.
I would also like to point out the LocalBitcoins algorithm is flawed. If you have 75% or lower feedback, it doesn't matter how fair your rate is, you will inevitably end up right at the bottom of the listings and literally nobody will see your advertisement.
LocalBitcoins is not a fair playing ground and this needs to be changed. The entire feedback system has to be revamped and the algorithm should be changed to show who has the best rates regardless of feedback. Even if you have 3% feedback, you should still show right at the top provided you have the best rate.

Please fix this system.

Thanks!
submitted by GlowingRadiance to localbitcoins [link] [comments]

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE FROM COINEX

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE FROM COINEX

to Cryptocurrencies: LTC, the most famou
Written by the CoinEx Institution, this series of jocular and easy to understand articles will show you everything you need to know about major cryptocurrencies, making you fully prepared before jumping into crypto!
The LTC we are going to talk about today is Litecoin, one famous “altcoin”. Why is it called “altcoin”? That’s because it is a copy of BTC, sharing the same technical implementation principle. Legend even has it that “if the Bitcoin is gold, then Litecoin is silver.”
However, what makes LTC stand out from many other altcoins? Let’s take a closer look.
In early years, the popularity of BTC brought about a large number of “copycats”, which sprang up like mushrooms. Only a few of them have survived. As of now, there are at least 30 altcoins around the world, such as the Litecoin, Primecoin, Biocoin, Ripple, ZCC Coin, and Megacoin. Among them LTC took the lead as the most famous altcoin.
The creator of LTC is Charlie Lee, a talent who graduated from MIT and used to work at Google. Inspired by BTC, he designed LTC in 2011.
Although LTC technically has the same implementation principle as BTC, both its creation and transfer are based on an open source encryption protocol, free from custody of any central authority; however, it is different from BTC in that it enables efficient “mining” and faster transaction confirmation even with consumer-grade hardware (2.5 minutes on average). It is said that the LTC network is expected to produce 84 million monetary units.
An “altcoin” as it is, LTC has its own mission and purpose, which is to improve BTC. Moreover, LTC is considered as “the cryptocurrency that has most successfully improved Bitcoin algorithm.”
Compared with BTC, LTC has three significant features:
  1. The LTC network can process one block every 2.5 minutes (instead of 10 minutes), so it can provide faster transaction confirmation;
  2. The LTC network is expected to produce 84 million LCT, four times the amount of BTC;
  3. LTC uses the scrypt encryption algorithm first proposed by Colin Percival in its proof-of-work algorithm, which makes it easier to mine LTC on ordinary computers than BTC.
In other words, compared with the cryptocurrency system of BTC, LTC has faster transaction confirmation, higher network transaction capacity and efficiency. Therefore, LTC was able to stand out from many “copycats”.
Some BTC players once said: “If you can’t afford Bitcoin, try Litecoin.” The BTC rush has attracted many, and its counterparts, i.e. these “altcoins” represented by LTC, have gone viral as well. According to data from overseas media, the low price of LTC has made China the largest market for LTC transactions. CoinEx, a world-renowned digital asset trading service platform, supports LTC trading, attracting numerous investors to gain wealth.
Charlie Lee, founder of LTC, once liquidated LTC in December 2017, “a crazy action” as it was known in the field. He suggested on social media that he had sold and donated all his own LTC yet without providing more details on the quantity and price of the sale.
At that time, LTC took on a clear upward momentum as its price once soared to $ 375 before Charlie Lee’s liquidation, an increase of 7000% compared to the beginning of the year. Some investors have wondered if it was because Charlie Lee had lost confidence in the future of LTC that he decided to quit. After his liquidation, both LTC and BTC slumped in 2018, sending the cryptocurrency market to a recession.
After the liquidation of LTC, Charlie Lee suggested in an interview that he “regrets selling all Litecoin” because the selling price at that time was lower than the highest level in history in the short run, but he still believed that was a correct decision in the long run. He also mentioned that he would leave this industry after LTC’s success.
In what direction will LTC go in the future? Stay tuned. If you have any idea, please follow CoinEx and let us know.
About CoinEx
As a global and professional cryptocurrency exchange service provider, CoinEx was founded in December 2017 with Bitmain-led investment and has obtained a legal license in Estonia. It is a subsidiary brand of the ViaBTC Group, which owns the fifth largest BTC mining pool, which is also the largest of BCH mining, in the world.
CoinEx supports perpetual contract, spot, margin trading and other derivatives trading, and its service reaches global users in nearly 100 countries/regions with various languages available, such as Chinese, English, Korean and Russian.
Website: https://www.coinex.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/coinexcom
Telegram: https://t.me/CoinExOfficialENG
submitted by dammy1988 to ICOAnalysis [link] [comments]

Greif Expressed by Bjarne Stroustrup over the use of ‘C++’ in Bitcoins’ Algorithm

Greif Expressed by Bjarne Stroustrup over the use of ‘C++’ in Bitcoins’ Algorithm submitted by Tech_Crypto to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Waltonchain adds GNU General Public License details to code - BUT does the code contain this?

Waltonchain adds GNU General Public License details to code - BUT does the code contain this?
Dear Crypto community,
Yesterday we saw Waltonchain release their Open Source code which resulted in huge criticism regarding the oversight of removing the original copyright to the original codebase, Ethereum Go, on which it is based.
Following this, the team have now updated the code to show the original copyright:
Image from Github
Source: https://github.com/WaltonChain/WaltonChain_Gwtc_Src/blob/mastep2p/rlpx.go?utm_source=share&utm_medium=ios_app
Github: https://github.com/WaltonChain?tab=repositories

I'd like to say thank you to the community for having such strong opinion on this matter, and for all the subreddit admins that assisted in creating clarity toward this. As a global community we should hold every blockchain up to the same standards, and I am grateful that this was shown in regard to the GNU General Public License.

Now that the issue is resolved, and since Waltonchain is currently a hot topic, I implore all the coders and devs out there to delve deep into the code to see exactly what Waltonchain have released. Not just the modification to the eth codebase, but the additional code. What does the code allow?

What we've been told as a community is that the Waltonchain source code has changes that allows for:
  • Security - DASH X11 - Most cryptographic algorithms used in cryptocurrencies use only one hash function for calculation. There are 11 of them in X11, which provides a higher degree of protection against hackers and scams. Waltonchain has customised the DASH X11 hashing algorithm to fit their purpose.
  • More secure than Bitcoin. The Bitcoin algorithm is SHA-256 is based on a previous secure hash algorithm family of standards, namely SHA-2, the hash functions within the X11 algorithm all successfully made it into the second-round in search for a new, more secure standard — SHA-3. Keccak, the function which won the competition and is therefore the new standard on which SHA-3 is based on, can at the very least be considered more secure that SHA-256.
  • Efficiency — Waltonchain have produced ASICs with the equivalent hashing power of 200GPUs (32–40kW) whilst using only 135W, thus helping the parent chain become decentralised
  • PoS aspect works in tandem with PoW, in that it adds a reduced difficulty based on number of coins held and time between blocks. Effectively the longer coins are held and the longer the time between blocks, the lower the difficulty for mining blocks. This again enhances the power efficiency of the network in its entirety.
  • Fast cross-chain searching via Proof of Labour —PoL enables hash values or indices from sub-chains (child chains) to be synced with the parent chain in a ‘cross chain index mechanism’ to enable fast searches for data via the parent chain.
  • Scalibility — Unlimited scalibility due to child chains; each CC is an independent blockchain (or DAG) using its own consensus mechanism (PoS, PoA, PoW, PoeT, etc) and can store data within itself. The parent chain by nature therefore cannot become bloated.
  • Atomic Swaps — PoL by nature ensures a record of every inter-chain transaction is held, and allows the function of atomic swaps between currencies.

Also to note is that the code has been audited by Knownsec, the same company that audited projects like HPB and NANO.

Lets have an open dialogue and talk about these features of the code - but firstly, do they exist? Hopefully people will approach this with the same enthusiasm as they did yesterday.

EDIT 1st June: A user on the Waltonchain sub has done an analysis which by the looks of it, disproves the initial assessment by many of the 'blockchain experts' in cc that have said the open source code is simply a copy and paste . https://www.reddit.com/waltonchain/comments/bveqea/changeset_goethereum_v171_to_gwtc_v110/
It is interesting to see just how much people love to hate Waltonchain that they spread misinformation either intentionally, or unintentionally, and that it gets the most attention out of any announcement.

For reference:
Block explorer: www.Waltonchain.pro (all wallets, mining wallet, documentation etc is available via that link)
submitted by Yayowam to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Greif Expressed by Bjarne Stroustrup over the use of ‘C++’ in Bitcoins’ Algorithm

Greif Expressed by Bjarne Stroustrup over the use of ‘C++’ in Bitcoins’ Algorithm submitted by medallionsmonarchy to TheCoinRepublic [link] [comments]

Anyone else interested in bitcoin? I implemented a large chunk of its technology in C. Includes base58 and base32 encoding, an implementation of the elliptic curve encryption algorithm, node intercommunication, and some other things. Take a look and let me know what you think.

Anyone else interested in bitcoin? I implemented a large chunk of its technology in C. Includes base58 and base32 encoding, an implementation of the elliptic curve encryption algorithm, node intercommunication, and some other things. Take a look and let me know what you think. submitted by always_programming3 to C_Programming [link] [comments]

CODE FUD: Resolved.

Dear Waltonchain community,
Yesterday we saw Waltonchain release their Open Source code which resulted in huge criticism regarding the oversight of removing the original copyright to the original codebase, Ethereum Go, on which it is based.
Following this, the team have now updated the code to show the original copyright:
Source: https://github.com/WaltonChain/WaltonChain_Gwtc_Src/blob/mastep2p/rlpx.go?utm_source=share&utm_medium=ios_app
Github: https://github.com/WaltonChain?tab=repositories

I'd like to say thank you to the community for having such strong opinion on this matter, and for all the subreddit admins that assisted in creating clarity toward this. As a global community we should hold every blockchain up to the same standards, and I am grateful that this was shown in regard to the GNU General Public License.

Now that the issue is resolved, and since Waltonchain is currently a hot topic, I implore all the coders and devs out there to delve deep into the code to see exactly what Waltonchain have released. Not just the modification to the eth codebase, but the additional code. What does the code allow?

What we've been told as a community is that the Waltonchain source code has changes that allows for:

Also to note is that the code has been audited by Knownsec, the same company that audited projects like HPB and NANO.

Lets have an open dialogue and talk about these features of the code - but firstly, do they exist? Hopefully people will approach this with the same enthusiasm as they did yesterday.

For reference:
Block explorer: www.Waltonchain.pro (all wallets, mining wallet, documentation etc is available via that link)
submitted by Yayowam to waltonchain [link] [comments]

Nuv mining | Can You Creat a Ton Of Money Via Bitcoin Mining?

Consumers, investors, fanatics or even technology smart geeks may be wonderful Bitcoin enthusiasts. They can even follow all Bitcoin information as well as have a solitary inquiry in mind. People might simply want to figure out, whether an optimistic future can be taken of mining different cryptocurrencies. Well, it's not a trick or stunning paid announcement. Mining of cryptocurrencies can be a smart step, aside from being a financially rewarding one. And also the appeal of Bitcoin market can not be denied as well. The Bitcoin boom of 2013 and its huge rise in value brought about its reputation. The roller-coaster ride of Bitcoin as well as the other cryptocurrencies, called as Altcoins, discovered a location of reputation in each dictionary of the world. Digital currencies have actually earned adequate direct exposure, and a mining occupation including them can really supply earnings. The miners nevertheless, have to have three points - adequate time, adequate money and an unequaled perseverance.
nuv mining
The initial hurdle involves the option of a cryptocurrency. A fanatic can go on to mine Bitcoin. Or instead pick to extract other readily available cryptocurrencies, Dogecoin, Litecoin or Peercoin. In other words, miners have a lot of options. Comparable to stock, even cryptocurrencies have classifications, blue chip or dime. Mining the blue chip category is commonly associated with security, integrity and a greater amount of profit. Financial on these attributes, individuals are much more inclined towards Bitcoin mining, even if it includes utilizing an enormous computer power. Altcoins, on the other hand, can also offer a fair gain as algorithms are less complex. However with Altcoins, simplicity of mining as well as the potential gains are not always proportional.
nuvmining
Hardware is an element that begins to disclose the real examination. Also a techno-savvy miner can not refute the Bitcoin problem linked to brand-new block generation. The point is to decide upon the computing power to be used. For Bitcoins, algorithms have come to be difficult to hash. Thus, GPUs of gigantic power combined with high-end RAMs and also reputable hard disk drives have to do all the task. The point is to hash at a quick price. Several high-end GPUs running together can speed up block generation and also consequently the payouts. On the various other hand, picking an item of software could not be as tricky. Windows can be selected as the required OS, yet open-source Linux does a far better job. One more demand is a digital wallet. Extracted money have to be kept. One can keep it locally on hard-drive or remotely online. A miner just has to select wisely.
With hardware and software in position, the task of mining begins. A miner may do it all alone, as well as collect all advantages. However the gear has to be tremendously effective. So it's fairly doubtful. Mining pools appear to be a sensible solution as people team up to contribute hash power and makers. Thus coins obtain extracted at a great speed. Collaborating has its advantages; miners get their reasonable share. Multipool is an economical choice. If Altcoin mining is to be embarked on, Middlecoin should be the miner's choice. So with all the active ingredients in place, a profitable mining gear can start. First investment may seem overwhelming, however the earnings are worthwhile!
submitted by Nuvmining to u/Nuvmining [link] [comments]

Reboot continually to restore gameplay

I am having issues with endless need to reboot and clear cache to enable stable gameplay. During events this is an annoying but tolerable need. But now I am at the levels the core gameplay required station raids, it has become unplayable, once I fill an Envoy ship I am required to reboot and empty cache, as the game will not respond, this takes over a full five minutes as STFC will load fresh as all the temporary files are dumped! with reloading game state screen and pop up ads to get through to get back to the action is making this critical part of the impossible, the station is regenerating too in this time requiring a fresh attack ship! I am guessing it is the algorithms Scopeley use for resources to prevent fraud, similar to crypto, bitcoin algorithms. Is anybody else getting this?, phone is Redmi note os Google android.
submitted by LeJackdaw to STFC_Official [link] [comments]

What is Bitcoin algorithm?

What is Bitcoin algorithm?
A significant element of Bitcoin that facilitates its operation is the Bitcoin algorithm for proof of work mining, which is known as Secure Hash Algorithm 256 (SHA-256).
Learn more about the Hamdan Token Click Here: www.hamdantoken.io
#hamdantoken #cryptocurrency #bitcoin #blockchain #btc #crypto #price #ethereum #ico #ltc #trading #eth #market #money #forex #bitcoinmining #cryptonews #investment #entrepreneur #cryptotrading #business #forextrader #investing #bitcoinnews #litecoin #invest #binaryoptions #bitcoincash #coinbase #bitcoins #ripple #investor #trader #binance
https://preview.redd.it/v95k5177cic41.jpg?width=800&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=f00c75d021ad79686e94641fb68d97a34796544e
submitted by hamdantokenofficial to u/hamdantokenofficial [link] [comments]

What is the Bitcoin algorithm?

What is the Bitcoin algorithm?
A significant element of Bitcoin that facilitates its operation is the Bitcoin algorithm for proof of work mining, which is known as Secure Hash Algorithm 256 (SHA-256).
Learn more about the Hamdan Token. Click Here: www.hamdantoken.io
#hamdantoken #cryptocurrency #bitcoin #btc #crypto #price #ethereum #ico #ltc #trading #eth #market #blockchain #money #forex #bitcoinmining #cryptonews #investment #entrepreneur #cryptotrading #business #forextrader #investing #bitcoinnews #litecoin #invest #binaryoptions #bitcoincash #coinbase #bitcoins #ripple #investor #trader #binance
https://preview.redd.it/aajut3awewa41.jpg?width=800&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=be2cc939e35192dcc32d857578ef10b01a26a883
submitted by hamdantokenofficial to u/hamdantokenofficial [link] [comments]

Bitcoin algorithm.

Can anyone tell me how does bitcoin algorithm share datas with the whole network? I am studying in socket programming.
submitted by Baturalp52 to learnprogramming [link] [comments]

would a change to the bitcoin algorithm potentially reduce the amount of power consumed powering bitcoin? would it be difficult, what would the hypothetical ramifications be?

I am currently reading the uninhabitable earth by david wallace wells, and within it they mentioned with a simple change to the bitcoin algorithm, that change could significantly reduce the amount of electricity consumed by miners to process each block, with out getting to techy is this feasible, if so what would be the potential ramifications of a change be?
submitted by henchman54 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What is Bitcoin algorithm?

What is Bitcoin algorithm?
A significant element of Bitcoin that facilitates its operation is the Bitcoin algorithm for proof of mining, which is known as Secure Hash Algorithm 256 (SHA-256).
Learn more about the Hamdan Token Click Here: www.hamdantoken.io
#hamdantoken #cryptocurrency #bitcoin #blockchain #btc #crypto #price #ethereum #ico #ltc #trading #eth #market #money #forex #trading #bitcoinmining #cryptonews #investment #entrepreneur #cryptotrading #business #forextrader #investing #bitcoinnews #litecoin #invest #binaryoptions #bitcoincash #coinbase #bitcoins #ripple #investor #trader #binance
https://preview.redd.it/rgevrvwmos241.jpg?width=800&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=6f8f8322555211b7aad63ca33af5561210521087
submitted by hamdantokenofficial to u/hamdantokenofficial [link] [comments]

11-14 09:43 - 'Does Google's Quantum Computer, Sycamore Pose Threat To Bitcoin's Algorithm' (cryptoprice.ng) by /u/Vblings removed from /r/Bitcoin within 496-506min

Does Google's Quantum Computer, Sycamore Pose Threat To Bitcoin's Algorithm
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: Vblings
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Algorithmic Trading Bot 比特币机器交易算法

The aim of this project is to produce a system which takes bitcoin currency data and predicts how the value is likely to change (increase or decrease). This data was then be used by a number of classification algorithms to predict if the value of bitcoins is likely to rise or fall. Based on this prediction the system would vote to either buy or sell bitcoins.
此项目搭建一个提取比特币价格并做出价格(上涨还是下跌)预测的系统。数据用于几个分类算法中,预测价格上涨还是下跌,基于此预测,系统做出对比特币买进还是卖出的投票信号。
Source:Rowlands J. Bitcoin Algorithmic Trading Bot[J]. 2014.
submitted by CosmicBC_Tech to CosmicBC [link] [comments]

Currencies of Social Organisation: The Future of Money (Sherryl Vint)

so, was reading Davies, William (ed.) - Economic Science Fictions (2018) the other day, and thought i'd share the entire chapter Currencies of Social Organisation: The Future of Money from part I: The Science and Fictions of the Economy. bit long, but worth the while.
oh, and, how does it relate to holochain, some might ask again. read up. it quickly becomes self-evident.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
"Presented with the prospect of its own eternity, capitalism –​ or anyway, financial capitalism –​ simply explodes. Because if there’s no end to it, there’s absolutely no reason not to generate credit –​ that is, future money –​ infinitely."
David Graeber, Debt: The First 5,000 Years
Perhaps the first thing that comes to mind when thinking aboutscience fiction and money is the different kinds of currencies that are imagined for future worlds: the poscreds of Philip K. Dick’s Ubik, a currency required for every minute transaction such that the door becomes not an item you own but, rather, a provider of services for which you must continually pay, leaving protagonist Joe Chip trapped in his own apartment until someone pays his door to open; the bars of gold-​pressed latinum used by the avaricious Ferengi on Star Trek, the only thing that cannot be replicated in this post-​scarcity world, useless other than as an atavistic marker of wealth; the reputation-​ based currency of whuffie in Cory Doctorow’s Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom, used to replace the social role money plays in creating a hierarchy in another post-​scarcity world. The inventiveness of SF writers creating objects or systems of account that might serve as money is matched by its actual history and the wide range of items that have served as currency, from large stone wheels called Rai used as money on the island of Yap, to the split tally sticks of medieval English practice, to coinage and the ideal that a gold standard is the ‘real’ value of money, to slips of paper inscribed with various authentications and, finally, to the electronic signals used to store and transmit denominations of value. It turns out that, although most of the world uses money on a daily basis and has done so for almost as long as there have been records of human civilisation, it is not very clear what money actually is. How does money work? What is the underlying relationship among some underlying thing of ‘actual’ value (gold, land, the goods and services produced by a nation), the tokens of that value (coins, banknotes, electronic account balances) and the entity guaranteeing that said tokens are, basically, the same as that underlying thing of value (the King, the Bitcoin algorithm, the European Union). Reading about the history of money turns out to be surprisingly like reading science fiction: the kind of money a society has tells us a lot about the kind of human sociality that is possible in that world. Most definitions of money agree that it needs to be three things: a medium of exchange, a unit of account and a store of value. The ‘store of value’ requirement tends to be overlooked in science fiction extrapolations, confusing whether money is simply a way of keeping ‘score’ of who owes what to whom or whether money is itself something of inherent value (even if it has no ‘use value’, such as gold), such that it will continue to be accepted even through periods of massive social and political disruption. More importantly, however, commentators agree that changes to this configuration of value, accounting, exchange practices and objects-​ serving-​as-​money are deeply consequential for the surrounding social order. Jack Weatherford argues in The History of Money, for example, that new forms of money destroy old forms of governance that were premised on the prior system of economics. 2 His book takes us through a number of such transitions: from a tributary economy of empire based on commodity money that was destabilised by the invention of coinage; through the invention of a system of banking and paper notes that disrupted and undermined the feudal system of medieval Europe by opening a path for power based on wealth (stocks and bonds) rather than on heredity (land); to the prediction that our contemporary system of electronic transfer will have similarly transformative effects on the future. Although science fiction has often imagined new objects or systems serving as currency in the future, it has seldom worked through the cultural power of money as an engine of social control, preferring to either posit post-​scarcity societies of human fulfilment, such as Star Trek’s benevolent Federation of Planets or Iain M. Banks’ Culture universe, or else envisage worlds of ever-​deepening capitalist uneven development that polarises humanity between lush zones of privilege and apocalyptic zones of deprivation that are, crucially, simultaneously produced by the same forces –​ the Sprawl of William Gibson’s cyberpunk trilogy, the orbiting gated community of Elysium (Neill Blomkamp), the privatised air of Rose Montero’s Bruna Husky series or the future of privatised food and seed corporation governance in Paolo Bacigalupi’s The Windup Girl. Although science fiction is frequently set in the future, it is always about its present moment of production. Thus, rather than predicting future kinds of money and sociality inherent in this coming shift, the more important thing science fiction can do is to help make visible –​ through estranging extrapolation that denatures what we take to be natural –​ how money functions in our present. In Money: The Unauthorized Biography, Felix Martin argues that we misrecognise money in its classic definition. Instead of thinking of it as a unit of exchange or store of value, he argues that money is a ‘social technology’ composed of three central elements: a denominating unit of value; a system of indebtedness and credits; and the possibility that debts can be transferred to another creditor. It is this third element that is the most crucial, and he contends that, ‘whilst all money is credit, not all credit is money’. Money is a social technology of transferable credit, ‘a set of ideas and practices which organise what we produce and consume, and the way we live together’. Martin goes on to explain that to arrive at this idea it was necessary first to develop one of a universal standard of value, a concept of economic value that is detached from any particular social organisation in which a debt might be incurred. Debt thereby becomes not a social exchange between people as part of a larger social structure of mutual obligations but simply a unit of account that might be transferred to another creditor and mean exactly the same thing, as if the value measured by money was a physical property in the world instead of a measure of human social structures and decisions. This idea of abstract and universal value opens the door to some of the more deleterious effects of the social technology of money. As Martin acknowledges, ‘[T]‌the choice of monetary standard is always a political one –​ because the standard itself represents nothing but a decision as to what is a fair distribution of wealth, income, and the risks of economic uncertainty.’ For Martin, the decision to view money as a thing rather than a social technology –​ which he dates to the Enlightenment and John Locke, with his insistence that the value of the coinage had to be the ‘material’ value of the metal, not the nominal value designated by the sovereign –​ was the first step in what would eventually become our 2008 financial crisis. In the Lockean understanding of money as a thing with inherent and universal worth, a centuries-​long question regarding the degree to which money should be allowed to structure how we live with one another was short-​circuited, taken out of the realm of ethical debate and put into that of natural ‘fact’. We treat money as a mathematical truth rather than a social choice with often disastrous consequences, reducing ‘vital questions of moral and political justice to the mechanical application of objective scientific truths’. 7 With this understanding of money, Western societies came to see a myriad of complex human social relationships through the single and narrow framework of economic self-​interest. In its role as a genre that defamiliarises the present by exaggerating it into an imagined future, science fiction can serve a vital role in reminding us that money is a social technology, not a thing. For example, Andrew Niccol’s film In Time (2009) posits a world in which the unit of account is simply time: one works not for dollars or credits but for minutes, hours, days and, ultimately, years of one’s life. One of the things it immediately makes clear is how ridiculous the fiction is that capitalists and workers (that is, sellers of labour-​power) meet at the market in any manner that remotely resembles an exchange among equals: the capitalist can always wait another day for a more favourable negotiation but the worker, who needs to sell his or her labour-​power to continue to live, cannot. Niccol shows the social costs of inflation, which makes a cup of coffee cost more ‘minutes’ than it did the day before, creating dilemmas for workers who can stretch the working day only so far to accommodate the change. More and more of one’s time is spent working –​ that is, accumulating minutes to live –​ but at some point the number of currency minutes needed to sustain life exceeds the time needed to accumulate them, and the most economically vulnerable simply die. The rich, in contrast, are seemingly immortal, since their time simply existing continues to accumulate ever more minutes through the crucial fact that what they own is capital, not mere labour-​power. Time is a problematic image for currency, of course: it can function well as a unit of account and perhaps even can serve as a medium of exchange (people gamble minutes, hours and years; people give one another minutes, and such economic support is, quite literally, life support), but it is difficult to imagine how time can be a store of value. This is where the film’s attempt to critique the discrepancy between the one-​percent and everyone else falls apart: a disaffected one-​percenter with centuries of life but no purpose (Matt Bomer) decides to give his years to protagonist Will Salas (Justin Timberlake), who uses this unexpected luxury (of time that need not be productive) to penetrate the echelons of the wealthiest citizens –​ tolls to these inner zones are paid in weeks, then months, then years –​ and attempt to destroy the system of lives held in thrall to generating money. The image the film uses to convey this revolutionary overthrow is a raid on a ‘bank’ that has an accumulated stockpile of time, time that is simply sitting there unused while people expire due to its lack. Salas forms a partnership with the disaffected daughter of one of the bank’s major stockholders (Amanda Seyfried), and together they steal and freely distribute this vast quantity of ‘unused’ time, thereby ending the structures of precarity lived by those struggling to ensure they have enough ‘time’ to live another day. Rather than critiquing the limitations of imagining time as a currency, I want to focus instead on what this image makes visible: that money is a social technology, that it always is, as Martin argues, a political tool that structures the way we live collectively and what we as a society have decided is a fair distribution of wealth and risk. By so directly linking the ability to secure a wage to the chances to continue to exist, In Time lays bare an underlying logic of neoliberal capitalism that is otherwise obscured by a discourse that naturalises the market and attempts to compel us to believe that we must accommodate ourselves to its dictates rather than recognise that its very functioning is a creation of human choice. If time in the film functioned as do other currencies, of course, Salas’s heroic gesture would simply contribute to inflation, the collapse of the ‘buying power’ of a unit of time. Despite this limitation, however, In Time points us towards the fundamental injustice of an economic system that extends some people’s lives and capacities while it shortens others. The underlying issue is the relationship between creditors (those with time to spare) and debtors (those whose very lives are in bondage to an economic system). David Graeber’s masterful Debt: The First 5,000 Years is actually another history of money, despite its title. One of his most powerful claims is that we more properly understand the social technology of money as a system of debt rather than one of credit. Whereas, for Martin, money is transferrable credit, Graeber points out that this is simultaneously a transformation of the social obligations that humans have to one another into specifically economic obligations, creating a society that, taken to its logical extreme, results in a world in which all social exchange is financialised debt. Graeber begins his book with an account of the massive social disruption caused by International Monetary Fund (IMF) loans to developing nations, indebtedness that required countries ‘to abandon price supports on basic foodstuffs, or even policies of keeping strategic food reserves, and abandon free health care and free education’ in the name of prioritising the obligation to pay back debt, leading to ‘the collapse of all the most basic supports for some of the poorest and most vulnerable people on earth’. Whereas for Martin the transferability of credit is essential to making it function as money, for Graeber it is precisely the way credit (that is, indebtedness) becomes transferable that creates the social chaos of a society that is thus premised on inequality. For Graeber, debt can become transferable only when it becomes ‘simple, cold, and impersonal’, detached from any larger social context of mutual support and purely a ‘precisely quantified’ sum for which ‘one does not need to calculate the human effects; one needs only calculate principal, balances, penalties, and rates of interest’. He traces the history of debt –​ and social crises of indebtedness –​ from the beginnings of recorded human civilisation through to the IMF crises and beyond, connecting the 2008 financial crisis and bank bailouts to the same fundamental mechanisms of inequality that always structure an economy based on money: just as governments spent money to repay IMF loans rather than to offer social services to their population, so too did governments pay to protect the wealthy few who own bank bonds at the expense of other taxpayers. This was a crisis created by the seemingly endless generation of new forms of credit, new ways to make money out of records of debt, a specific form of money as capital –​ that is, as money that must continually grow. Only the power of the US military, Graeber argues, holds the world economic system together based on a fear of reprisal: ‘[T]‌he last thirty years have seen the construction of a vast bureaucratic apparatus for the creation and maintenance of hopelessness, a giant machine designed, first and foremost, to destroy any sense of possible alternative futures.’ Here his discussion of the history of debt begins to sound a lot like discussions of the SF imagination. In recent years critics such as Fredric Jameson and writers such as Kim Stanley Robinson have deplored the failure of the utopian imagination, our inability to imagine alternatives beyond the social order created by capitalism. For Graeber, the disappearance of hope has to do with the crushing circumstances of chronic indebtedness, a cycle that has recurred throughout history and for which, until modern times, a solution existed. This solution is an amnesty on debt, a decision to simply reset all accounts and start over whenever the burden of debt on one segment of the population became so heavy as to debilitate its chances to thrive and also to destabilise the entire social order premised on class difference between debtors and debtees. Graeber links debt forgiveness to an ancient biblical Law of the Jubilee, which ‘stipulated that all debts would be automatically cancelled “in the Sabbath year” (that is, after seven years had passed), and that all who languished in bondage owing to such debts would be released’. Martin dates the idea of periodic debt forgiveness as a way to manage the socially deleterious effects of indebtedness even earlier, arguing that records of this ‘Mesopotamian practice of proclaiming a clean slate when the burden of debt became socially unsupportable are almost as old as the earliest evidence for interest-​bearing debt itself –​ dating from the reign of Enmetana of Lagash in around 2,400 BC’. Graeber ends his book with a call for a contemporary Jubilee on international and consumer debt, arguing that it would be helpful ‘not just because it would relieve so much genuine human suffering, but also because it would be our way of reminding ourselves that money is not ineffable, that paying one’s debts is not the essence of morality, that all these things are human arrangements and that if democracy is to mean anything, it is the ability to all agree to arrange things in a different way’. The best kind of SF vision of the future of money may thus be an idea taken from the distant past, a period proximate enough to the emergence of money and its new social structures that people remained capable of recognising it as a social policy, not a fact of nature. While science fiction has often imagined post-​scarcity societies that thereby eliminate indebtedness, very little has imagined the future of monetary policy and banking. A notable exception is the work of Charles Stross, especially his novel Neptune’s Brood, which uses a passage from Graeber’s book as its epigraph. Stross imagine the future of capitalist social organisation as mutated to accommodate trading across the vast distances of space colonisation and at the high speeds of computer consciousness. Taking his cues from the fact that much of the derivative market consists of trades done by algorithms and software, often requiring an advanced degree in physics to be understood, Stross posits a future of artificial humanoid beings whose ethos is shaped by an ecology of capital treated as if it were nature. Most of the critical discussion about the novel focuses on Stross’s idea of slow, medium, and fast money. Fast money is what we are accustomed to: ‘Cash is fast money. We use it for immediate exchanges of value. Goods and labor: You sell, I buy.’ Medium money is something that more durably stores its value, and is not reliant on the vagaries of governments and fiscal policy like fast money, as in: ‘Cathedrals and asteroids and debts and durable real estate and bonds backed by the honorable reputation of traders in slow money.’ And, finally, slow money is the kind of money required to finance interstellar trade and colonisation in a world without faster-​than-​light (FTL) travel: ‘Slow money is a medium of exchange designed to outlast the rise and fall of civilizations. It is the currency of world-​builders, running on an engine of debt that can only be repaid by the formation of new interstellar colonies, passing the liability ever onward into the deep future.’The details of the novel’s adventure plot –​ featuring a forensic accountant hero –​ show us how such a society, continually passing along debt, would be filled with avarice and exploitation, with only the most instrumental of interpersonal relations. The novel is a careful and thorough figuration of the end extreme of capitalism. A vision of the future anticipated in the epigraph from Graeber above, a future of ever more overwhelming indebtedness, the flip side of money understood as transferable credit. The ultimate horizon of the novel is the reinvention of the Jubilee, the ‘systemwide rest of the financial system entailing nullification of all debts’. Its characters, shaped by capitalism as a necessary fact of life, struggle to imagine the possibility of such a Jubilee. The accountant protagonist, Krina, for example, is shocked when she hears of someone functioning as a debt termination officer, exclaiming: ‘[M]‌atters should never reach the stage where they need to terminate a bad debt! Far better to stir it up with a bunch of lumpen credit properties and shuffle it off to a long-​term investment trust for toxic assets.’ So how does Stross create the conditions for a Jubilee in Neptune’s Brood when no one is power has any incentive to forgive the debs that are the foundation of their social structure? The transformation happens because of the discovery of a kind of matter transmission that enables the equivalent of FTL travel, meaning all financial exchanges can happen at the speed of fast money, and so the accumulated stockpiles of wealth that are slow money are suddenly rendered meaningless. Indebtedness is thereby wiped out when the value of this currency collapses, since a vast slow money debt can now be paid with a pittance of fast money. Obviously Stross’s solution cannot easily be translated into our world, because we do not denominate our currencies in this way nor trade at interstellar distances. Yet I think it still holds a lesson for us that only the displacements of science fiction thinking can capture. The collapse of the slow money economy completely transforms existing power relations, and it is also devastating for those who have accumulated vast holdings in this debt-​based currency. At the same time, however, freedom from debt for others opens up so many more possibilities as to where the resources and energy might go that the positive elements of change are equally powerful to the disruptive ones. The transition is enabled in part by a branch of humanoids whose neural architecture has been transformed to communicate mental states through light, a post-​human redesign intended to make them more effective workers (bypassing the slowness of language). This transformation also changed their social order, however, in ways that ultimately sidelined money and property: ‘They’re still individuals, but the border between self and other is thinner. And they don’t hate. They own property but they don’t have strong social hierarchies –​ top-​down control is a dangerous liability to a team trying to trap a runaway natural nuclear reactor –​ they’re instinctive mutualists. They understand money and debt and credit and so on, but they don’t feel a visceral need to own: What they owe doesn’t define their identity.’ A different kind of human sociality plants the seed for a different relationship to property and money, which ultimately opens the door to detaching human futures from the tyranny of debt. If, as Martin argues, money is a social technology, ‘a set of ideas and practices which organise what we produce and consume, and the way we live together’, then science fiction can make visible the kind of social engineering done by the capitalist technology of money. As a social technology, the tool of money can be oriented towards other kinds of ideas and practices, other kinds of social orders, other kinds of subjectivities. Both In Time and Neptune’s Brood offer exaggerated and extrapolated visions of the society the current technology of money creates, focusing on the human suffering that is produced by keeping this technology in place. Science fiction has always been about the idea that social arrangements might be otherwise, about extrapolating known technologies towards novel ends. Stross gives us a tantalising hint of the possible future of a debt Jubilee, of one way we might reinvent the technology of money.

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Comparing Major Mining Algorithms Mining Bitcoin with pencil and paper - YouTube DCA Adventure LiveStream - Ban Hammer Lifted on Bitcoin Youtubers! New Algorithm in Near Future? USB Bitcoin Miner - The Power of 1000's Computers - YouTube Counos, cryptocurrency, Blockchain Technology, like ...

Bitcoin trades are more easily executed if you have robots to assist you. That’s basically what bitcoin algorithmic trading is. Algorithmic trading refers to using computer software to execute several trade orders simultaneously. The trading is automated and instructions are programmed based on variables such as time, price, and volume. Bitcoin ist dezentral und frei von der Kontrolle durch Regierungen, Banken und Konzerne. Es wird deshalb von Freidenkern und Hackern als Währung der Zukunft gehandelt. Abgesichert sind die ... Finally, the block header is built from the new Merkle hash and the data provided by the pool, and the hash algorithm can iterate over the nonce values in the header, just like the Python program earlier. Once all the nonce values have been tried, the miner increments the extranonce2, generates a new coinbase transaction and continues. A Bitcoin block header Informing the mining pool of ... Bitcoin zu erklären ist manchmal höllisch schwer. Man weiß nie, wo man anfangen soll, und egal wie viel man redet, irgendetwas ist immer noch verwirrend. An dieser Stelle erklären wir Ihnen, wie neue Bitcoins entstehen. Und zwar so einfach, dass es auch Ihre 5-Jährige Nichte versteht. c# c algorithm bitcoin. share improve this question follow asked Mar 1 '12 at 8:10. Lu4 Lu4. 13.5k 12 12 gold badges 66 66 silver badges 119 119 bronze badges. I am not sure about this but maybe this thread may help? – ApprenticeHacker Mar 1 '12 at 8:35. Thanks, I will try to ask at bitcoin – Lu4 Mar 1 '12 at 9:31 @Lu4 Did you make any progress with mining with c# – MR.ABC Apr 2 ...

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Comparing Major Mining Algorithms

Bitcoins are mined using a cryptographic algorithm called SHA-256. This algorithm is simple enough to be done with pencil and paper, as I show in this video.... A look at the differences between mining on Bitcoin Cash/Bitcoin, Litecoin, and Ethereum. Learn about general proof-of-work, SHA-256, Scrypt, and Ethash. Thanks to subscriber xor for suggesting ... Based on Blockchain technology we made a new way that can be used to pay your financial transaction anonymously. Counos Cash, is a cryptocurrency like BitCoi... Heute geht’s um folgende Themen: Coinbase erhält E-Money-Lizenz in Irland, Monero nimmt neuen PoW-Algorithmus an & Unstoppable Domains bringt neue Domainendungen. Get an Uncensorable blockchain ... SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE HOW MUCH - http://shorturl.at/arBHL GekkoScience NewPac USB Miner - https://bit.ly/2RIQgdX GekkoScience 8 Port USB Hub - https://bit.ly/2x...

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